Leigh L. Klotz, Jr.

Friday, October 10, 2003

"I don't want to be the people my parents warned me to stay away from," said Jacobs of his decision. "It's 10 million bucks, but maybe I can make it back, and maybe [Halderman] can learn a little bit more about our technology so as not to call it brain dead."
As quoted in The Daily Princetonian. Or maybe CEO Peter Jacobs can get his company to develop software that's not utterly brain dead in the first place. Jeesh, a "copy protection" scheme that depends on CDs running windows autorun.bat files? And the company was worth $30 million? And he threatens to sue because someone pointed out that pressing the shift key in Windows turns off CD autoexec? Maybe I'll start a company whose product is a piece of sticky tape that you put on your CD, so you can't open the box, and then sue people who are able to open the box, because, hey, the only reason to open the jewel case is to copy the CD, right?