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developing issues

 
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mcguireek



Joined: 13 Jan 2010
Posts: 10
Location: idaho

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 5:39 pm    Post subject: developing issues Reply with quote

I just got into large format photography and I have no place to get film developed here. I also have no experience with developing film. I hear the easiest way to start (aside from using instant film) is with B&W film and tray developing. I have a room that I can easily convert into a temporary dark room, but I can't find exact information on what I need to buy to start developing film (I haven't even bought film yet). Can someone please make a list with brand names/pertinent info. about what I will need to start developing today (quantities would help also). I am dying to start shooting.
Thank you so much!
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45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3228
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What format is your camera?

To handle film in the open the room has to be light tight. To test sit in the room with the lights off for 5 minutes then if you cannot see any light anywhere put your hand 6 inches in front of your face and look around the room, if you cannot see your hand its dark enough to handle film in the open.

To do tray processing you will need to carry water into and out of the room if it does not have running water and a drain. You will also need a light tight fan and air vent.

It is easier to use a changing bag or portable changing room depending on the format you are using. You load the film into a daylight developing tank , the Jobo is the best and the Pattersons second best and the Combi-Plan a very distant third. With this set up you process at the bathroom sink, tub, or if you have very good habits the kitchen sink.

You also need a dust free place to hang the film to dry once the processing is completed.

For chemicals the liquid concentrates keep the best, are mixed to working strength just before using, and used one shot. A good developer is HC110. A stop bath is optional. There are many brands of low odor concentrate fixers so any one will be fine. A wetting agent such as Kodak PhotoFlow is recommended also. You will need a good photography thermometer.

Processing is develop for the time/temperature of the developer/film combination, rinse, fix, wash, apply wetting agent, hang to dry whether using tray or tank developing.
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mcguireek



Joined: 13 Jan 2010
Posts: 10
Location: idaho

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, beginners mistake. I have a 4x5 crown graphic.
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45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3228
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The best manual system for 4x5 sheet film developing using links to B&H:
Jobi roller base http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/25524-REG/Jobo_J1509_Roller_Base_for_Combo.html
Jobo 2521 tank http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/25558-REG/Jobo_J2521_2_Reel_Tank_with_Magnet.html
Jobo 2509n reel http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/25534-REG/Jobo_J2509N_4x5_Sheet_Film_Reel.html

The 2521 tank can be used for inversion processing but requires 1500ml of chemical and that gets heavy. The tank does not leak like a lot of other tanks.

An alternative: Combi-Plan http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/23845-REG/HP_Combi_Plan_459809_HP_Combi_4_x.html .
The one I had was slow to fill and drain and always leaked. Others have stated the same problem with theirs. The film holder was not rigid and film would come out of the slots with normal to aggressive agitation. Works well as a dip and dunk tank but would require 3 for dip and dunk processing in a totally dark darkroom.

The Yankee daylight tank http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/63620-REG/Yankee_YACF45_Cut_Film_Daylight_Developing.html .
Newer design than I am familiar with. Older style allowed chemicals to slosh out easily and was difficult to get even development due to chemical flow and side to side agitation requirement. This one might be OK starting out if you want to keep expenses down but don't expect too much from it. (read the reviews)

Tray development: You will need 4 or 5 trays, 5x7 the smallest size to process 4x5 sheet film. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/362624-REG/Yankee_YAB57_Ribbed_Plastic_Developing_Tray.html
You will need a tray for each chemical and a prewash; prewash plain water, filtered or distiled; developer; stop bath, can be water like the prewash; fixer; rinse or wash tray. All chemicals are mixed and brought to developing temperature and kept there for the duration of the processing session. All steps from opening the film holders to removing the film from the fixer must be carried out in total darkness.

Tank processing: Load exposed film onto the tanks reel or holder in total darkness, close the tank and work in daylight. Prewash brings tank and film to the developing temperature and gets the film wet so that it absorbs the chemicals easier. Prewash is optional and Ilford says not to prewash with their films but it does not hurt them. Fill with developer, agitate initially and every 30 seconds to 1 minute there after, pour out the developer at the end of the required time them immediately pour in the stop bath or water rinse, pour out the stop or rinse then pour in the fixer and agitate every minute for the duration of the fix time, pour out the fixer and wash for 5 to 10 minutes with running water the same temperature as the developing chemicals. The best results are achieved when all chemicals and washes are kept within 1 degree of each other.

At the end of the final wash with either tank or tray processing treat the film with wetting agent then hang the film in a dust free place and allow to dry.

Handle film by the edges only!

Exact procedure can be described when you decide on type and chemicals you wish to use.

Agitation: Inversion processing in a sealed tank- Turn the tank upside down, pause for 1/4 to 1/2 a second then return to up right. Repeat 1 to 3 times per cycle.
Yankee tank- gently rock the tank side to side per tank instructions.
Tray processing- one sheet at a time gently lift the tray by a corner and return to level 2 to 3 times per agitation cycle; multiple sheets- pull sheet from the bottom of the stack and place on top, when all sheets have been cycled repeat for duration of developing time. Turning sheets 180 degrees each time they are brought to the top of the stack helps identify when the stack has been completely cycled. Care must be taken not to scratch the film.

Processing with the Jobo tank and roller base: Load the film into the tank, prewash, pour in the minimun amount of developer necessary to develop the amount of film in the tank or minimun amount of chemical specified for the format on the side of the tank whichever is greater, lay the tank on its side on the roller base and continually rotate changing direction of rotation every 30 seconds to 1 minute being consistent until the developing time or fix time has been reached.


Each developer on the market has a minimun amount of developer necessary to fully develope 80 square inches of film. The amount is in the manifacturers spec sheet for that developer.
80 square inches=1 sheet of 8x10 film; 4 4x5 sheets of film; 1 roll of 120 roll film; 1 35mm 36 exposure roll of film.
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mopar_guy



Joined: 07 Aug 2008
Posts: 126
Location: Washington, the State

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 2:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You may want to look for a copy of the Kodak Black-and-White Dataguide. I have one that I got new in the 1980's. Most of the information on specific products is outdated but there are quite a few illustrations and a ton of information. You can find these at used book outlets, or on the big auction site. Well worth it for the modest cost. There are also a ton of books out there with this kind of information (thrift stores, flea markets, etc).
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1banjo



Joined: 16 Nov 2008
Posts: 478
Location: kansas

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey all
you can goto
www. kodak.com/go/photochemicals
Chemicals
Tech Pubs
BW Chemicals
B&W Film Processing
B&W Paper Processing
J-78
KODAK Developer D-76
J-24
KODAK PROFESSIONAL HC-110 Developer
J-86
KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX Developers
J-24
KODAK PROFESSIONAL HC-110 Developer
TI0323
KODAK Fixer / Wash System Cleaner
and more

1banjo
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Jim23



Joined: 08 Sep 2001
Posts: 128
Location: US/Greater Cincinnati, Ohio

PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 1:26 am    Post subject: Film Development Reply with quote

I've been developing b&w sheet film for 41 years in a home darkroom and the only method I've had consistent results with is using stainless hangers in 1/2 gallon open tanks in total darkness. I've owned Yankee and FR tanks, even tried trays but ended up with fine scratches and fingerprints.

Using hangers with lift/tilt agitation at 1-minute intervals and following the Kodak developing times for large-tank works well - be gentle with the agitation (smooth motion) and complete each agitation cycle within 10 seconds.

Another method I've had is using my Jobo processor; however, adjusting times for continuous agitation is an issue.

In summary, the advice is to go onto that famous everything auction site and buy 6 Kodak 1/2 gallon hard rubber tanks (or plastic Yankee or Cesco) and 6 4x5 Kodak or Carr stainless hangers. Set the tanks up as follows:

Tank 1 - Dry, empty tank for unloaded hangers.
Tank 2 - Dry, empty tank for staging loaded hangers prior to dev.
Tank 3 - Developer
Tank 4 - Stop Bath or Rinse
Tank 5 - Fixer
Tank 6 - Hypo Eliminator and then film wash with running water.
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