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Flash Powder & Flash Lamps

 
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office888



Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Posts: 41
Location: Southwest Michigan

PostPosted: Wed Aug 18, 2004 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I intend on finally getting started with period 1860s wet plate collodion process photography, but I need information. such as:

1.) How is exposure calculated for the flash?

2.) Where can I acquire a flash lamp, such as the Ingento Sure Shot, or the No.1 Automatic, or the No.2 automatic? I'm after acquiring a large one.

3.) Is there a book available on the wet plate collodion process? I know the basics, but would like to double check on a few things that i'm guessing on, such as coating the plate. Some people say to pour the collodion on the edges and evenly shake it on..some say to submerge the plate in collodion. Same with sensitizing the plate.

Thank you,
Richard

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RichS



Joined: 18 Oct 2001
Posts: 1467
Location: South of Rochester, NY

PostPosted: Wed Aug 18, 2004 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hate to say right off that I can't be much help... But if you find info on the flash equipment & use, I would like to hear about it!

I would suppose that lacking any documentation about flash and plates sensitivity that you would fist have to experiment to find an ISO speed for the plates. Then you could probably use a standard flash meter to find basic guide numbers for the flash. But just guessing here...

As far as the Collodion process, all I could say is "good luck". A rather nasty & difficult proces for today, especially considering the chemicals involved. Be VERY fire conscious!

An excellent book on all things 'alternative' is "Coming into Focus" by John Barnier. There's a very good chapter on Collodion.

There's also an Alt mail list full of people who know such things. Here's some info on that:

SUBSCRIBE----------------------------------------
To subscribe from this list send an email message to the
address alt-photo-process-request@sask.usask.ca
with the following text in the body of the message
subscribe alt-photo-process-l
WWW------
Each message is converted to a www page. An index page is
maintained listing all the messages. It is possible to
generate an index page based on the message's topic, thread,
author or date. They are available from the site
http://www.jump.net/~gwalker/altphoto
-------------

If you succeed, I would like to hear about it! Good luck!
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t.r.sanford



Joined: 10 Nov 2003
Posts: 812
Location: East Coast (Long Island)

PostPosted: Wed Aug 18, 2004 8:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think there are two phases here: (1) devise a method of mixing the sensitized wet collodion that provides a wet plate whose exposure characteristics are consistent from batch to batch; (2) then worry about flash exposures. Once you can assign an exposure index to the material, the rest should be smooth sailing, although tiresome.

I am not sure that flash was used with wet collodion plates, to any great extent. By the time flash technology became generally available, dry plates (and films on flexible base stock) had supplanted wet plates for field work. Wet collodion hung on in the graphic arts for a surprisingly long time, but it was a thorough nuisance when you weren't working in a shop.

The only flash powder apparatus I have ever seen online is here:

http://www.marriottworld.com/stock_pics/olderpics/flasholder.htm

The Marriotts are good people to deal with.
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RichS



Joined: 18 Oct 2001
Posts: 1467
Location: South of Rochester, NY

PostPosted: Wed Aug 18, 2004 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, the alt-photo list info was incorrect (it changed)... Here's the current info:

A R C H I V E S

An web-page based archive of all the list messages is at the address:

http://www.usask.ca/lists/alt-photo-process

W E B M I R R O R

All messages sent to the list for the current month are automatically
converted to web pages at the address:

http://duke.usask.ca/~holtsg/photo/current
=================

And if you haven't yet been there, a visit here might help?
http://www.alternativephotography.com/process_wetplate.html

And if you happen to go sane You could try modern tintypes here:
http://www.rockaloid.com/products.html#tintype




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TonyK



Joined: 14 Nov 2004
Posts: 1
Location: New Hampshire

PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2004 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Richard,
My name is Tony Kiburis & I was a wet plate collodion photographer for three years during the mid 1970's. My partner & I started the American Tintype Gallery which eventually operated in the Geoage Eastman House. I would like to share with you some insites that will help you become sucessful.

1). Two points about the wet plate emulsion: first, it is very color sensitive. It reacts only to the UV & blue side of the spectrum; yellows, orange, & red do not effect the emulsion. Second, the emulsion speed is very slow; we estimated its ASA of about 2.5 to 3.0 (I’m dateing myself). We never tried flash photography because we were trying to present the 1860’s photo experience of 20 second exposures using headstands.

2). Our best tintypes were created under “Daylight” flourescent light. It was “Blue” & constant. It eliminated one variable: exposure. Customers at the Eastman House were surprised that we were not using “sunlight”. We used (10)80 watt tubes mounted in the skylight of the "Tintype Wagon" exhibit.

3). Regarding books on the subject I have two to recommend:

First, is “The Silver Sunbeam” by J. Towler, M.D. It was first published in 1864; it’s currently in reprint & it’s ISBN # is 871000059 Check out http://www.addall.com for the best pricing.

Second, is a 1935 copy of a Kodak manual called, “Collodion …and The Making of Wet-Plate Negatives”. The newspaper industry, well into the 1940’s & early 50’s used wet-plate to make line & halftone negatives. This manual will short cut the learning process greatly. I can get a copy of mine for you for probably $10.00.

If you like to chat about the process write me at Ress20@juno.com

All the best,
Tony K.
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glennfromwy



Joined: 29 Nov 2001
Posts: 903
Location: S.W. Wyoming

PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2004 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you contacted Bostik & Sullivan? Good suppliers of alternative process stuff

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"Wyoming - Where everybody is somebody else's weirdo"
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