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newbie has several questions!

 
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DD936E201



Joined: 10 Jun 2014
Posts: 2
Location: Staten Island, New York

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 6:53 am    Post subject: newbie has several questions! Reply with quote

Hi all;

I was recently given an Anniversary Speed Graphic, complete with carrying case, flash tube, several filters, and a few negative holders. My experience with cameras has been limited to point-focus-click, so I have several questions I'd like to ask.

I found online sources for sheet film, but not in the correct size. Is it difficult to cut it down to the size I need? Do I need a special tool, or would sharp scissors and a steady hand do?

What about developing the negatives and making prints? I hope to learn these in the future, but for the time being, where would I go? Could any commercial photographer do this work, or should I find a specialist?

Lastly - and this one might make me look silly - although I've heard terms like ISO, F-stop, shutter speed, etc., I don't really know what they mean. I'm a bit intimidated, are these things difficult to master?

Many thanks for any advice you can give.

Larry
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45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3219
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I was recently given an Anniversary Speed Graphic, complete with carrying case, flash tube, several filters, and a few negative holders. My experience with cameras has been limited to point-focus-click, so I have several questions I'd like to ask.

http://www.southbristolviews.com/pics/Graphic/manual-pdf/Anniversary.pdf
Quote:
I found online sources for sheet film, but not in the correct size. Is it difficult to cut it down to the size I need? Do I need a special tool, or would sharp scissors and a steady hand do?

Most that cut down sheet film use a rotary trimmer. Unprocessed film must be handled in total darkness.
You have a few days left to order some sheet film from Ilford in the correct size for your camera.
http://www.ilfordphoto.com/products/page.asp?n=137

Freestyle list FP4 and HP5 in 3x4 format for the Ilford special order.
http://www.freestylephoto.biz/category/2-Film/Black-and-White-Film?attr[]=1-51

Quote:
What about developing the negatives and making prints? I hope to learn these in the future, but for the time being, where would I go? Could any commercial photographer do this work, or should I find a specialist?

There may be a commercial lab in your area that does both printing and developing, finding another photographer that will process your film and print it may be difficult.


Quote:
Lastly - and this one might make me look silly - although I've heard terms like ISO, F-stop, shutter speed, etc., I don't really know what they mean. I'm a bit intimidated, are these things difficult to master?

ISO- manufacturers rating of how sensitive to light the film is also called film speed.
F stop- the size of the aperture opening in the lens, controls how much light is allowed to pass through the lens. Each stop allows half as much light through as the previous stop when you go from small f numbers (larger aperture opening) to larger f number (smaller aperture opening)
and each stop allows twice as much light as the previous when going from small aperture openings (larger number) to larger aperture openings (smaller number). The range of f stop one commonly encounters in Graphic cameras is f3.5 to f32.
Shutter speed is how long the shutter stays open to allow light through the lens.
Film speed, shutter speed, and aperture determine the correct exposure for a given film.

Many books have been written on basic photography. You need to take a basic photography course through a school or at least read a book or two on the subject.
You have not mentioned a light meter, do you have one? A light meter a necessity for accurate exposures.
You can work without a meter using the "Sunny 16" rule:
In bright sunlight a correct exposure is 1/film speed for the shutter speed or the closest speed on you shutter to it at f16; in open shade its 1/film speed at f8.
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peter k



Joined: 26 Dec 2009
Posts: 167
Location: Sedona Az

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome aboard..
45pps covered it all pretty well... but wanted to encourage you.

As stated you can special order 3.25 x 4.25 from Illford B&W via Freestyle, but delivery I believe is in the fall. So if you want to use your Anniversary and begin to learn photography before then, you'll have to learn how to cut your own film.

I also have a Anniversary Speed Graphic, that I use quite frequently and cut all my film for it and a 9x12 Zeiss.
Its not difficult, in fact really easy. What is nice about cutting 3.25 x 4.25, from 4x5, is that both cuts are .75 of an inch. So all you need to do is set the trimmer to cut .75 of an inch. Being careful to keep the emulsion side up, cut the narrow edge, turn 90*, cut the longer edge.

How do you know which side has the light sensitive emulsion?
Each 4x5 sheet of film has a notch, or notches in it. Which designate what 'film' it is and when this notch is off center, to the right, the emulsion side is up. Here check this out, it will give you a good introduction to film, film holders and how to load them.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbST9NFR7SU

Ha... in fact cutting the film will be one of the least learning curves you will have, in photography.

I happen to use a small paper cutter that I happened to have on hand, at the time, and converted it for film use only, with some templates. I use it inside a dark bag.
But as stated a rotary trimmer would work very well, and be safer.

Being located in Staten Island N.Y. , check your local colleges, I'm sure you'll find some available classes in photography offered.
Have fun... I love my Anniversary, and because its lighter an smaller than the 4x5, it's easier to use when I go hiking or messing around on the water or in the creek, and don't want the tripod.
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