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Pacemaker Speed Graphic for barrel lenses

 
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cyberjunkie



Joined: 05 Aug 2012
Posts: 8
Location: Bologna, Italy

PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2012 2:32 am    Post subject: Pacemaker Speed Graphic for barrel lenses Reply with quote

I am a large format lens collector.
I bought my first batch of second hand lenses for my Technika III and Fatif 13x18, > 25 years ago.
I stopped shooting large format some years later, because i stopped doing product photography.
Photography became just an hobby, so i closed my darkroom, stored my LF gear, and continued shooting with 35mm and MF.
A few years ago i moved to a new house, so i brought with me all the LF stuff that was left unused for many years in a basement.
After a few days i found myself in love with analog photography, and shortly after i started with my current mania for old brass lenses.
3 1/2 years later i have 14 LF cameras at home (i have sold a few of them lately), plus more than 150 vintage lenses.
Most of them are in barrel, and while the majority were made for 5x7", 8x10", or more, a good number are perfectly usable with a 4x5" camera.
I love experimenting with old lenses, especially soft focus or portrait ones, but i found that working with accessory shutters isn't exactly easy.
I realized that the easiest way to test a barrel lens (within a certain focal length) would be with a camera equipped with a focal plane shutter.
At first i decided for a 4x5" or 5x7" Graflex, but i realized very soon that very few of the cameras on sale are in perfect working conditions (and those who are don't come cheap).
After reading many pages on this invaluable site, i made up my mind and decided for a Pacemaker Speed Graphic.
Today i won one.
I had two choices, which qualified for my needs (graflok back and working curtain shutter): one was probably going to be sold for a cheap price, and the other was very likely to go for much more.
The cheap one was a Pacemaker with graflok and Hugo Meyer rangefinder, missing both lensboard and lens. It sold for very cheap: 97 USD + shipping.
The other one was a very late Model FP Pacemaker, with working shutter, graflok, and top-mounted rangefinder. It was in very good condition, and came with lensboard (missing the solenoid) and an Optar 135mm f/4.7 lens.
It went for much more: 255 USD + shipping.
The euro is weak, i am almost broke... but i decided to go for the expensive one. Shipping to the EU is more or less 60 USD, a considerable part of the total expense, so i decided that if i had to pay that much for shipping, it would be much better to choose a camera that was complete and looked almost new.

I hope i have done the right thing, and that the camera will show up in as good a shape as i hope it to be.
While i wait for the parcel, i would be happy to get a few advices from the experts out there.
The camera has one lensboard (with two holes revealing a previous installation of a solenoid), one lens, and probably a matching cam.
I guess it would be better to leave everything as-is, and prepare a new lensboard, that will be fitted with a diaphragm lens holder, which is currently sitting on an orphan Kodak 4x5" Master View board.
The Pacemaker lensboard should be a little smaller, but i am pretty sure it would fit.
I have seen a replacement wooden lensboard for very cheap.
Do you think it would be strong enough to hold a diaphragm lens holder + a medium size brass lens?
Better go for an original metal lensboard, and maybe use bolts and nuts to fix the lens holder?

I own a 162mm Wollensak lens, which should be the "normal" lens sold by Graflex, if movements were needed.
Is it difficult to find a cam for that lens?
Are the measures of the cam available?
Anybody making replacement cams on this forum?

Thanks in advance.
I am open to any kind of advice, observation, critique, etc.

have fun

CJ
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1banjo



Joined: 16 Nov 2008
Posts: 478
Location: kansas

PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2012 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

to start with go to the home page here go down the page to
Technical Information // do-it-yourself // Making More Rangefinder Cams

now as best as I can tell the two ends of all cams are the same size as to the get infinty has to be the same BUT the slope is what different for each lens
a long lens the slope will be almost no slope & a wide angle will have a fast sharp slope just off of infinty then a long flat part


lens boards can be from $5.00 to $50.00 this one is from over there
Lens board for the Graflex cameras 4x5 inches Item: 180944349552
you mite find it at a good price
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45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3196
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2012 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I have seen a replacement wooden lensboard for very cheap.

Graflex standardized some of its lens boards.
A board; wood; fits a variety of cameras from the early 1900's to the 1940's; 3 1/4 inch square.
C board; wood; 4 inch square; fits 4x5 Anniversary Speed and possibly other cameras.

Pacemaker lens boards- stamped aluminum, see http://graflex.org/helpboard/viewtopic.php?t=6333
for the dimensions.

I have made Pacemaker lens boards from 1/4 inch thick black acrylic and ABS plastic. The ABS is easier to form the lip on than the acrylic. Baltic Birch plywood makes good lens boards as it does not wrap with moisture changes. Wood will be hard to make the lip on and not have it break. The lip forms a light trap. Using the 1/4 inch thick material seats the board into the throat of the front standard/bellows and helps with the light trap.
Quote:
I guess it would be better to leave everything as-is, and prepare a new lensboard, that will be fitted with a diaphragm lens holder, which is currently sitting on an orphan Kodak 4x5" Master View board.

Attach the iris diaphragm to the outside of a "new" lens board whose mount hole is equal to to maximum iris opening of the diaphragm.

Quote:
Is it difficult to find a cam for that lens?
Are the measures of the cam available?
Anybody making replacement cams on this forum?

Cams are for the actual measured focal length of the lens, not its marked focal length. An incorrect cam will be off at the closer focused distances usually 25 feet or less. Pacemaker cam list:
http://graflex.org/speed-graphic/top-rangefinder-cams.html
Camera service manual:
http://www.southbristolviews.com/pics/Graphic/manual-pdf/servicemanual.pdf
Top rangefinder service manual (also part of the camera service manual):
http://www.southbristolviews.com/pics/Graphic/manual-pdf/TRFService.pdf
Guide book (user manual):
http://www.cameraeccentric.com/html/info/graflex_4.html
Shutter guide book:
http://www.cameraeccentric.com/html/info/graflex_12.html
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cyberjunkie



Joined: 05 Aug 2012
Posts: 8
Location: Bologna, Italy

PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 3:01 am    Post subject: Pacemaker Speed Graphic for barrel lenses Reply with quote

Thanks for the advices, and for the very interesting links.
A few of them had very useful informations, which i couldn't find with my my previous searches.
I've read that some tight fit wooden/plastic lensboard can be as good as an original one, but i am afraid that a diaphragm lens holder, plus a weighty brass lens, would require a metal board.
Some brass optics can be balanced, racking the lens back as much as possible, unfortunately most of them protrude a lot at the front, exercising a lot of torsion on the front standard/lensboard.
It's a true pity that i don't have a single one at home! Many of my lenses came with a lensboard, even some oddball types, but none with a Pacemaker's
If some forum member has one or more boards, which are not fit for standard use (oddball shutter sizes, drilled for top hat, macro cone or some other kind of attachment), i'd be happy to buy, if the shipment is not too expensive...
Frankly, $55 for a replacement board seems too much (that's the cost of the Ebay item # it was given to me). The last lens i purchased was a Wollensak W.A. Raptar 90mm f/6.8, which came in a recessed board and with a bi-post flash cord, all for $76.
I needed a bi-post flash adapter, and a Calumet recessed board (which i have seen on sale for $75!), so i gave it a go. Now i am very happy about it, cause it would be a nice wide angle for my new Pacemaker (IF the shutter is actually working... that's always a bet, buying as-is on Ebay).

I hope that everything will work OK.
I will report about success/problems.
If reality matches my expectations, i think i will sell my Technika III (5th version), with Angulon 90mm, cam, etc... If i need movements, my monorail will take care of that.
I am sure i will keep some backs for 120 film, i guess that any graflok-compatible magazine would work, even a simple chinese-made 6x12. Isn't it?
BTW, i have already a couple of Graphic accessories, which i purchased for my Technika: a Singer brand 6x7 back and a Grafmatic.

I guess that not many people go to a Speed Graphic from a Linhof Technika, but i think that a Pacemaker has its advantages.
Focal plane shutter and integrated fresnel, to name two.
There is one thing that i consider even more important, though. It's the construction of the front standard.
All Technikas have small lensboards, on top of that the Technika III has a weak construction: most of them have been overused for professional work, with an extensive exercise of front movements, and after so many years most examples have a lot of "play" in the front standard.
At least mine has... and i have been told that it's a very common problem.
A Pacemaker has a different construction, with reduced number/extension of movements, and i guess that a gently used one should have a robust front, good enough for my intended use.
After all, a 15" Wollesak tele was one of the standard lenses. Not the lightest optic, be it in shutter or in barrel!

If i am overlook something important, please let me know.


have fun

CJ
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45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3196
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 4:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've sent you a Private Message about lens boards.
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cyberjunkie



Joined: 05 Aug 2012
Posts: 8
Location: Bologna, Italy

PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 8:40 pm    Post subject: Thank you! Reply with quote

I thanks you all for your warm and friendly support.
I browsed through some forum posts (i'll check a few more, and do some more searches, in the coming days); i didn't find the kind of snobish posts, which are quite common on other forums. It's a nice surprise

As i have already started to post this answer, i take the chance to ask one last question:
which is the peculiarity of a "Model FP" Pacemaker?
I understand that it's a very late product, but i have seen pictures of other late models which don't have the "Model FP" moniker on the lower lensboard bracket.
Is there any difference with other top rangefinder Pacemakers?

have fun

CJ
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45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3196
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 9:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did a Google search for "Pacemaker Speed Graphic FP" and this is the first hit:
http://www.cameramanuals.org/prof_pdf/pacemaker_speedgraphic_1000.pdf
Which says Speed Graphic FP has a focal plane shutter while the Speed 1000 and Crown do not. The Speed 1000 is a Speed without the focal plane shutter and has the Graphic 1000 leaf shutter.
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cyberjunkie



Joined: 05 Aug 2012
Posts: 8
Location: Bologna, Italy

PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

45PSS wrote:
I did a Google search for "Pacemaker Speed Graphic FP" and this is the first hit:
http://www.cameramanuals.org/prof_pdf/pacemaker_speedgraphic_1000.pdf


Last time i ask without doing my homework first. Promise!
I did it on a whim, after paying my homage to the nice attitude of the most helpful forum members...

I did some searches first, but i couldn't clear all my doubts.
I have two questions left:

1) the seller wrote me that the double image of the rangefinder is somewhat off, vertically. I found the instructions for adjusting the rangefinder, and to realign horizontally, but no mention of a vertical realignment.
There should be an alignment screw, but i didn't spot it. The images are xerox'ed, in B&W, not grayscale.
Any advice?

2) the lensboard of my camera has two empty holes, for a (missing) solenoid.
After a short research i found that originally there were two models, #2 and #3, with a later addition of a #0 model, which was used on Super Graphic, with the only use of actuating the shutter from the flash handle button (from what i understand, the sync connector was missing).
For my needs, a sync connector would be only a complication, i have plenty of lenses with leaf shutters, which syncs at all speeds.
Now that i think about it, there is a sync on the body of the camera, but i didn't check if it can be coaxed to work with modern electronic flashes, or not.
What a REALLY need is a solenoid which could fire a shutter that can't be used with a standard cable release. There are american-made Compounds which have only the attachment for pneumatic bulb, then there are more modern shutters which have a malfunctioning/missing cable thread (some have no cable attachment by design!).
Then there are shutters which don't accept a standard, conical shaped, cable, or need a long-throw plunger.
Imagination is the limit...
For the moment, i need to understand if any solenoid would be fine for my use, or if i should look for a determined model.
At the same time, should i look for ANY flash compatible with a Graphic camera?
If the power cable is missing, is it easy to find the appropriate plugs, and make myself a replacement?
I see that there were a number of compatible flashes, made by Graflex or by third parties, with two or three battery cells, but i don't know if all of them use the same standard cables.
As it's very unlikely to find all the needed parts together, i must understand what i need beforehand, and then look for them on Ebay/forums.
I have lots of small parts, lens cells, etc. lying unused in some drawer. It's a true pity, i would like to see them in use. If i can make up my mind about a list of parts that could be useful for what i want to do with my Speed Graphic, i am sure i could trade some of those un-needed parts, for something that could be useful for my new photographic toy

Being a newbie in the Graflex world, i didn't know that there were so many options, and a plethora of accessories sold by other makers.
Unfortunately in the EU there is a limited choice. Mostly complete cameras (Speeds and Crowns, Super's are not so common). Dedicated accessories/parts are seldom found.
On the other hand, having them shipped from the other side of the ocean isn't exactly cheap. I guess it's better to be patient and wait for the right chance (read: flash, cables and solenoid sold together).

Any help is really appreciated

have fun

CJ
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Dan Fromm



Joined: 14 May 2001
Posts: 1881
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Now that i think about it, there is a sync on thge body of the camera, but i didn't check it it can be coaxed to work with modern electronic flashes, or not.


No. Absolutely not. Never. The body sync terminal is to be used with a flash bulb (chemical, long duration) and the focal plane shutter. Since the FPS' slits are narrower than the gate, an electronic flash (short duration) can't be used with the FPS

Quote:
What a REALLY need is a solenoid which could fire a shutter that can't be used with a standard cable release. There are american-made Compounds which have only the attachment for pneumatic bulb, then there are more modern shutters which have a malfunctioning/missing cable thread (some have no cable attachment by design!).
Then there are shutters which don't accept a standard, conical shaped, cable, or need a long-throw plunger.


Hmm. You started out wanting to use lenses in barrel with the FPS, now want to use lenses in shutter. Well, that's very possible.

Re firing a leaf shutter without using a cable release, that's what the infernal Pacemaker Graphic body release is for. A cable runs from the release (lower right front of body) to the front standard, pulls down a paddle that pushes the shutter's release lever down. You'd be better off using a finger. There are three sizes of paddle. In my experience they're specific to a few models of Rochester-made shutters. I hope I'm mistaken about this.

Quote:
At the same time, should i look for ANY flash compatible with a Graphic camera?


Why limit yourself? I know. You're a collector, you have a bad case of the completeness disease.
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cyberjunkie



Joined: 05 Aug 2012
Posts: 8
Location: Bologna, Italy

PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 12:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Dan.

You're partly right about the desease.
It's not "completeness", as i can't afford it, more a "plenty-ness" desease

While the ability to shoot barrel lenses was the main reason for buying a Speed, it didn't mean that i was planning to use it for that sole purpose.
Not at all.
In fact, i have a few lenses which were part of the original selection advertised by Graflex for their Graphic cameras, and a few that were of common use, back then.
I recently sold a nice Rotelar in Compur/Graphic shutter, which was a "special" for the Graphic. That's probably the reason that explains why the lens is underappreciated. IMHO, of course....
I know that you are a Graphic expert, Dan. So i accept your advice about trying to use the front paddle, if possible.
Unfortunately the "front" release lever was made to be used with certain shutters (with three interchangeable paddles, as you wrote), and i guess that it's not as adjustable as a solenoid.
The solenoid can be affixed in any position, with standard or adapter boards. That way, the vast majority of vintage shutters can be cajoled to work in a way or the other, using a chain/hook (which can be lengthened or shortened with ease, if needed).
Anyway, i agree that the best solution is always the standard, in-camera, function.
I'll try to adapt the existing paddle, IF possible. Unfortunately there are many shutter types which have the release lever in impossible places, though i don't remember a single release lever with no hole.
I have many pneumatically actuated shutters, from the early years of 1900, for which the solenoid would be the most elegant solution (in one or two cases the only one - i.e. if the actuating cylinder is missing).

cheers

CJ
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Dan Fromm



Joined: 14 May 2001
Posts: 1881
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CJ,

I applaud your enthusiasm.

Re cable releases, I direct your attention to the Graflex XL. Many of its lenses have no cable release sockets; with them, the cable release attaches to a gadget on the front of the lens tube -- in effect, on the lens board -- and presses on the shutter's release lever.

Re paddles, take a look at them. I think that system is an abomination, but the paddles themselves are simple and I think shouldn't be too hard to make one to suit lenses that the standard issue can't be used on.

Don't fixate on the solenoid. There are other ways to accomplish what you want to do. Explore possible solutions before settling on one.

Also remember that there's no mandatory way to orient a shutter on a lens board, subject to projections from it clearing the front standard and its latch. This is a worse problem on my 2x3s than on your 4x5. A round shutter tube will turn freely in the round hole in the board (or in your iris lens holder, which can hold a lens in shutter as well as a lens in barrel) until the retaining ring is tightened.

As I said, if all else fails there's always a finger. In my experience, tripping a shutter with a finger is a problem only with wide angle lenses.

Good luck, have fun,

Dan

Of course you have the completeness disease. It won't run its full course until you have more resources. Work hard, save your small monetary units.
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45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3196
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 2:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
1) the seller wrote me that the double image of the rangefinder is somewhat off, vertically. I found the instructions for adjusting the rangefinder, and to realign horizontally, but no mention of a vertical realignment.
There should be an alignment screw, but i didn't spot it. The images are xerox'ed, in B&W, not grayscale.
Any advice?


In my first post I linked to a service manual. On PDF page 8, top left paragraph C and figure 8, mid paragraph. I assume the top cover must be removed to access the screw.
OR
With the top cover removed there will be a small screw at the rear edge of the fixed mirror mount frame. Turn it to move the image vertically.

On Super Graphics if the rangefinder arm is bent slightly it will drag on the housing preventing the arm to fall back into position when changing the cam unless it is snapped into place or pulled into place as the movable mirror springs are not strong enough to over come the drag.

Quote:
2) the lensboard of my camera has two empty holes, for a (missing) solenoid.
After a short research i found that originally there were two models, #2 and #3, with a later addition of a #0 model, which was used on Super Graphic, with the only use of actuating the shutter from the flash handle button (from what i understand, the sync connector was missing).

A solenoid was used to sync a shutter with the firing of a flashbulb. Shutters had no built in flash sync at the introduction of flash bulbs. At one point in time Graphex shutters were made with no flash sync, full sync (flash bulb and electronic flash) or electronic flash sync only built in. Flash bulbs were introduced in the 1930's, electronic flash in the early 1950's.

http://graflex.org/helpboard/viewtopic.php?t=1453&highlight=solenoid+adjustment

A later use is as an electronic shutter release.

Quote:
For the moment, i need to understand if any solenoid would be fine for my use, or if i should look for a determined model.
At the same time, should i look for ANY flash compatible with a Graphic camera?

Solenoids are current devices. Any solenoid will be fine. DO NOT use a BC cartridge to fire the solenoid. The solenoids are designed to be used with 3 D cell batteries that are capable of producing at least 7 amps of current. Send me a PM if you are interested in a copy of the solenoid manual.

Quote:
At the same time, should i look for ANY flash compatible with a Graphic camera?
If the power cable is missing, is it easy to find the appropriate plugs, and make myself a replacement?

Yes any 3 D cell that you can mount to the camera will be fine.
Most battery cases use standard non polarized household plugs (U.S.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC_power_plugs_and_sockets
scroll to midpage-NEMA 1-15 (15 A/125 V ungrounded) under North American and IEC 60906-2

Power cords from old U.S. electric razors work for bi post shutter contacts and the pins from the razor could be used for the pins for the solenoid. Any pin that fits snugly into the solenoid, allows you to solder a wire to it, and will not short to the adjoining pin will work.

Quote:
Re firing a leaf shutter without using a cable release, that's what the infernal Pacemaker Graphic body release is for. A cable runs from the release (lower right front of body) to the front standard, pulls down a paddle that pushes the shutter's release lever down. You'd be better off using a finger. There are three sizes of paddle. In my experience they're specific to a few models of Rochester-made shutters. I hope I'm mistaken about this.


The paddles were made for #1, #2, and #3 Graphex shutters. Use one as a template and customize the "new" one you make to work with the shutter you want to use it on. Please note that the paddles are not easy to change out and make swapping lens difficult.
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cyberjunkie



Joined: 05 Aug 2012
Posts: 8
Location: Bologna, Italy

PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

45PSS wrote:
Quote:
1) the seller wrote me that the double image of the rangefinder is somewhat off, vertically. I found the instructions for adjusting the rangefinder, and to realign horizontally, but no mention of a vertical realignment.
There should be an alignment screw, but i didn't spot it. The images are xerox'ed, in B&W, not grayscale.
Any advice?


In my first post I linked to a service manual. On PDF page 8, top left paragraph C and figure 8, mid paragraph. I assume the top cover must be removed to access the screw.
OR
With the top cover removed there will be a small screw at the rear edge of the fixed mirror mount frame. Turn it to move the image vertically.

On Super Graphics if the rangefinder arm is bent slightly it will drag on the housing preventing the arm to fall back into position when changing the cam unless it is snapped into place or pulled into place as the movable mirror springs are not strong enough to over come the drag.




I browsed that PDF, but i didn't get that the adjustment screw in picture #8 was for vertical alignment.
I have an excuse: it's not always easy to understand a service manual with no camera in your hands.
I will refrain from posting any other question until the camera arrives.
In the meantime, i'll try to digest the wealth of informations provided by the answers to my questions, and contained in the linked documents.

The more i read, the more useful and interesting informations i find.
The only missing bits are the scans of some sample cams, for the most used lenses. There are general infos about making yourself the cams, and there is a nice list on this site with the product numbers of all the cams.
A nice addition would be to have actual size (1:1) scans of the most common cams (with a ruler included in the picture).
I am sure that there are many DIY types who would derivate a missing focal from available ones, and eventually release new informations to the community.
Sometimes a good scan can be really helpful.
I have a recent example, from my own experience: i have two Rodenstock Imagons with missing disks ("tea strainers"); after getting the scans, i thought about many possible solutions, and now i have decided to buy a box of transparent sheets for overhead projection, which will be printed in B&W with my inkjet, and then cut to the right diameter and fitted on top of the lenses. Not as robust as the original metal disks, but still usable.

cheers

CJ
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cyberjunkie



Joined: 05 Aug 2012
Posts: 8
Location: Bologna, Italy

PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 10:32 pm    Post subject: infinity stops Reply with quote

I have found infinity stops that allegedly belonged to a Super Graphic.
Are they usable with my late (top rangefinder) Pacemaker?
I tried to find the information, but i was unable to find a definitive answer.

thanks in advance for your help

ciao

Paolo
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45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3196
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 11:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes. Fold down type infinity stops will fit the Century, Pacemaker, and Super Graphic camera bodies.
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