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Metering my crown graphic

 
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KeithNP



Joined: 30 Nov 2001
Posts: 26
Location: Loma Linda, CA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2001 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just "inherited" (dad gave me) a crown graphic in good working order (shutter is sticky, but I'm having it cleaned) He also gave me an old Weston light meter (master II? it think) I don't trust it, but is there any way to test/ recalibrate it? If not, can I just use the spot meter on my F100 set to the correct ASA?
I know the daylight trick (direct clear sunlight at sealevel, f16, shutter speed is as close to film speed as you can get, then adjust up and down to suit image), but that doesn't work well in mixed light, or on cloudy days or inside. I have a new baby, so spending money on anything is not an option right now, so I can't just go out and buy a new meter.
Help!
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daleraby



Joined: 24 Nov 2001
Posts: 60
Location: Green Bay, Wisconsin

PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2001 9:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is no reason not to trust a Weston Master II, but unless I miss my guess, it will be calibrated in something other than ASA values, so you'll have to make a conversion... the best way to test an exposure meter is always a test shot (or 2 or 3) with careful record keeping.

I am guessing that the F100 you are refering to is another camera I am unfamiliar with that has an integral exposure meter. If that is the case, there is no reason not to use it to determine exposure. You could also use it to "calibrate" your Weston Master II.

Bear in mind that unless you are shooting transparencies you have a fair amount of latitude in your exposures. Even then, with most of them, you have a fairly large margin for error. (Unfortunately, I don't believe that Kodachrome 25 is made in 4x5 format any more, if it ever was, which is too bad).

Dale A. Raby
Editor/Publisher
The Green Bay Web
http://www.thegreenbayweb.com
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45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3259
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2001 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Using your F100 with a 50mm lens or wider fixed focal length lens with centerweighted metering option selected and read an 18% grey card or simular should give the same reading as the weston. The F100 is a reflected meter and the weston is an ambient.
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Dan Fromm



Joined: 14 May 2001
Posts: 1893
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2001 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

On 2001-12-03 17:57, 45PSS wrote:
Using your F100 with a 50mm lens or wider fixed focal length lens with centerweighted metering option selected and read an 18% grey card or simular should give the same reading as the weston. The F100 is a reflected meter and the weston is an ambient.


Um, er, ah, but I think you've misused a word. You said 'ambient' and seem to have meant 'incident.' And that isn't so, the Weston Master also meters reflected light. To meter incident light with one requires fitting an incident light adapter (Invercone, in Weston-speak) and pointing the working side of the meter from subject towards camera.

Reading a gray card with a reflected meter gives about the same result as metering incident light if the card is in the subject position pointing (guess where?) at the camera.

Cheers, and sorry to be such a humorless pedant, but it really does matter,

Dan
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CharlesC



Joined: 10 May 2001
Posts: 25
Location: East Tennessee

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2001 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a word of caution.

I had very similar experience. I came by a Gossen Luna Pro. When compared to my Canon thru-the-lens meter, it was about 2 stops slow. I was about to seek repair when my local photo shop suggested that I check readings against their light table. They knew what a meter should read on it.

As it turns out, the Canon was the one in error, not the Luna Pro. I had been shooting mostly C-41 films in it and latitude kept me out of serious exposure trouble.
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daleraby



Joined: 24 Nov 2001
Posts: 60
Location: Green Bay, Wisconsin

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2001 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I may reitterate (did I spell it right?)... The best way to test an exposure meter is by shooting test shots... this tests the entire system, camera, lens, meter. Once you have your exposure correct, you can make any adjustments necessary from that point on by applying your own personal "correction factor". This eliminates the need to recalibrate your meter... a frequently expensive and poorly performed repair.

Theoretically you could use any film for this purpose, but using a transparency film with poor exposure latitude (what transparency films are available in 4x5 anyway?) will give you the most accurate results.

Even when "accurate", a given setting is only a manufacturer's suggestion as to what will give the best results. I used to routinely expose Kodachrome 25 at ASA 32 for better color rendition.

Dale A. Raby
Editor/Publisher
The Green Bay Web
http://www.thegreenbayweb.com
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45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3259
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2001 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My responces ass u me that the poster has some knowelege unless they indicate so.

Ambient light is metered with an indicent meter.

The object is to point the asker in the right direction. The misuse of terms is not that incorrect.

Once I test or comair readings of suspect meters ( Use a third if two have a difference of more that 1 stop ) then use a low latitude film to fine tune.

Hope the origional poster has a good idea of hoe to quickly determine if his weston is working properly. Using a F100 suggest he has some knoweldge about metering.
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